Tug McGraw Foundation

 

News & Events

July 15, 2015

Veteran Exemplifies The Tug McGraw Spirit

 

On Monday, July 27, 2015,  It was an emotional and exciting day both for Steve Miller and the Veterans Home Of Yountville's Mixed Nutts team. Home resident and veteran, Steve Miller has been using his daily chair to catch fly balls and cruise the bases on.  In recognizing the limitations, knowing the benefits of connecting with community, and the theraputic value of the outdoors. The foundation stepped up to the plate and partnered with the Kovachs' to inhance his playing and outdoor quality of life by presenting him with the Freedom Mobility 6x6 Chair.  The residents of the Yountville Veterans Home including Mayor John Dunbar together with Steve's family came out to watch and celebrate the man who exemplifies Tug McGraw's "Ya Gotta Believe" spirit. Assemblyman, Bill Dodd threw out the first pitch and the home members were treated to hot dogs and hamburgers.  Click here, to watch Steve's Tribute Video.

 

Vietnam Veteran Steve Miller has been in a chair for nearly eight years as a result of MS and the affects of Agent Orange. In recollecting how his legs started giving way, "I can remember going to work in July and my brain telling me my legs to shut down-by August I was in a chair."

 

We were inspired watching Steve show up at every practice fielding balls and batting from his chair. Simply in awe how he could roll over the divots in his everyday chair to catch fly balls.  Watching Steve play was inspirational. He's out there giving 110%. It was then and there that the Tug McGraw philosophy came into play. He's got the "Ya Gotta Believe." spirit and we need to improve his quality of life of playing ball! Steve is an inspiration and reminder that you can do anything despite the challenges that have been given to you. In asking Steve what it means to receive this chair, " There are others that are so much more deserving. This chair opens up a whole new world for me. For the first time, I will be able to cruise over and see the pond at the home and go fishing!" Photo: John Moreono, Assemblyman Bill Dodd, Steve Roy, Steve Kovach, Ron Bush, Alane Kovach, Jennifer Brusstar, Don Veverka, Steve Miller

Not to mention Steve is very excited about the color scheme of the Camouflage! CEO, Jennifer Brusstar stated, " Steve is an amazing spirit who everyday gives hope and courage to others by just doing. He told me he can do everything but just run."

 

We are grateful to have such wonderful partners in Alane and Steve Koavch and Freedom 6x6 Mobility who are helping to improve quality of life for others. Borman Field is one of the most unique settings in our Country. Admission if free and The Borman Field Snack Shack serves some of the best hamburgers in town and of course we have the beautiful wines of our Napa Valley. T

 

 

About The Team

 

The History of Borman Field Moving Imagery of how the Yountville Veterans developed one American's most unknown treasures.

 

Who Are the Mixed Nutts? Chanel 2's Inteview, "War Veterans Build Friendships on Baseball Diamond."

 

Meet The 2015 Team Be inspired thumb through their Topps Baseball Cards!

 

 

July 9, 2015

Former NFL Player Benefiting from CereScan's Technology for TBI

KUSA - Jeb Putzier was a couple years into life after football. He was working for a medical equipment company - trying to help the surgeon and attendants in an operating room - when his brain went haywire.

 

"I'm in the O.R. trying to remember stuff and I couldn't do it," he said. "I couldn't remember things and then my fatigue was falling. I would come into the O.R., the stress of it, I just could not do it anymore."

 

Putzier, a 6-foot-6, 255-pound athlete whom during the Broncos' 2004-05 seasons (when he combined for 73 receptions) was known for making body-twisting catches across the middle, hanging on even after getting punished by those 10 O'clock highlight hits.

 

After playing nine years of professional football with four teams as a tight end – 4 and a half years in two stints with the Denver Broncos, two years with the Houston Texans, a half season with the Seattle Seahawks and one final season in 2010 with the Omaha Nighthawks of the now defunct United Football League – Putzier's life began to unravel cognitively, emotionally and physically a couple years after he stopped playing.

 

Like so many former NFL players, Putzier went through a marital divorce. Extreme, inexplicable fatigue would not allow him to hold down a 9 to 5 job. He suffered from depression.  And his condition only got worse. Much worse.

 

 

"I had been through a lot of hardships in life where I was pretty much done with it – I just wasn't myself," he said. "Everyone saw the 180 in my personality from where I was. I had been in the hospital for suicidal things. Different problems. I just acted differently."

 

To the rescue came CereScan, a state-of-the-art functional brain imaging company based in the Littleton. CereScan is capable of detecting injuries to the brain that otherwise don't show up through the usual X-Rays, MRIs or CT scans.

 

"The type of brain scanning we do makes the invisible injury visible," said Dr. Greg Hipskind, the chief medical advisor of CereScan.

 

CereScan has treated more than 20 former NFL players, including Hall of Fame offensive lineman Ron Yary and former University of Colorado and New England Patriot linebacker Ted Johnson.

 

Watch The Interview

Source: NBC 9 News Colorado

Photo Credit: Getty Images

 

CereScan and the Tug McGraw Foundation

The Tug McGraw Foundation has partnered with CereScan to seek new and more efficient identification of and treatment for invisible wounds such as Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI). The Invisible Brain Injury Project is aimed at addressing mTBI sustained by current and former military members. CereScan is dedicated to performing state-of-the-art functional brain imaging for the identification of a wide array of brain-based disorders.


The company's proprietary process includes the latest generation of high-resolution gamma cameras, highest quality radio pharmaceuticals from GE Healthcare, the industry's leading brain-image reconstruction software and specially trained board-certified physicians.  Click Here, to View Study.

KUSA - Jeb Putzier was a couple years into life after football. He was working for a medical equipment company - trying to help the surgeon and attendants in an operating room - when his brain went haywire.

"I'm in the O.R. trying to remember stuff and I couldn't do it," he said. "I couldn't remember things and then my fatigue was falling. I would come into the O.R., the stress of it, I just could not do it anymore."

Putzier, a 6-foot-6, 255-pound athlete whom during the Broncos' 2004-05 seasons (when he combined for 73 receptions) was known for making body-twisting catches across the middle, hanging on even after getting punished by those 10 O'clock highlight hits.

After playing nine years of professional football with four teams as a tight end – 4 and a half years in two stints with the Denver Broncos, two years with the Houston Texans, a half season with the Seattle Seahawks and one final season in 2010 with the Omaha Nighthawks of the now defunct United Football League – Putzier's life began to unravel cognitively, emotionally and physically a couple years after he stopped playing.

Like so many former NFL players, Putzier went through a marital divorce. Extreme, inexplicable fatigue would not allow him to hold down a 9 to 5 job. He suffered from depression.

And his condition only got worse. Much worse.

"I had been through a lot of hardships in life where I was pretty much done with it – I just wasn't myself," he said. "Everyone saw the 180 in my personality from where I was. I had been in the hospital for suicidal things. Different problems. I just acted differently."

To the rescue came CereScan, a state-of-the-art functional brain imaging company based in the Littleton. CereScan is capable of detecting injuries to the brain that otherwise don't show up through the usual X-Rays, MRIs or CT scans.

"The type of brain scanning we do makes the invisible injury visible," said Dr. Greg Hipskind, the chief medical advisor of CereScan.

CereScan has treated more than 20 former NFL players, including Hall of Fame offensive lineman Ron Yary and former University of Colorado and New England Patriot linebacker Ted Johnson.

June 15, 2015

TMF's Photo Class Aimed At Wounded Warriors

 

By Linda McIntosh2:07 P.M.JUNE 15, 2015

Camp Pendleton Marine Cpl. Juan Dominguez, a triple amputee, views photos in an exhibit as part of a photography class he and 14 other Marines at the base's Wounded Warrior Battalion participated in for 12 weeks as part of the recovery process from battlefield wounds.

The class, called fStop was organized by the Yountville-based Tug McGraw Foundation.

Photo by Cpl. Shaltiel Dominguez (not related to the subject).

Camp Pendleton Marine Cpl. Juan Dominguez, a triple amputee, views photos in an exhibit as part of a photography class he and 14 other Marines at the base's Wounded Warrior Battalion participated in for 12 weeks as part of the recovery process from battlefield wounds. The class, called fStop was organized by the Yountville-based Tug McGraw Foundation. Photo by Cpl. Shaltiel Dominguez (not related to the subject).

 

CAMP PENDLETON — A group of injured Camp Pendleton Marines participated in a photography class aimed at helping wounded service members express themselves through art as part of the recovery process from battlefield wounds.

 

Fifteen Marines at the Wounded Warrior Battalion graduated from the 12-week fStop photography course run by the Tug McGraw Foundation, a nonprofit based at the Veterans Home in Yountville that provides support for people with brain tumors and brain related trauma, including post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury.

 

The class led by professional photographer Terence Ford, taught wounded Marines how to communicate through photography.

 

Marines took photos of their families and went out in the community for photo shoots. Participants worked out of a photo lab at the Wounded Warrior Battalion.

 

The class was aimed at helping wounded service members transition into civilian life. Participants were challenged to be introspective, Ford said. The first assignment required participants to take pictures of themselves or things that represent who they are.

 

Photography works as a healing tool giving service members a way to engage the community and their families, said Jennifer Brusstar, co-founder and CEO of Tug McGraw Foundation.

 

Marines who completed the class were congratulated by Brig. Gen. Edward Banta, Commanding General, Marine Corps Installations-West and Maj. Gen. Lawrence Nicholson, commanding general, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, at a ceremony earlier this month at the Hope and Care Center on base.

 

The next class is scheduled for June 23.

 

For information, visit http://www.fstopwarrior.org or email terenceford55@gmail.com or call (707) 738-3134.

Photo class aimed at wounded Marines

Camp Pendleton Marine Cpl. Juan Dominguez, a triple amputee, views photos in an exhibit as part of a photography class he and 14 other Marines at the base's Wounded Warrior Battalion participated in for 12 weeks as part of the recovery process from battlefield wounds.  The class, called fStop was organized by the Yountville-based Tug McGraw Foundation.  Photo by Cpl. Shaltiel Dominguez (not related to the subject).Camp Pendleton Marine Cpl. Juan Dominguez, a triple amputee, views photos in an exhibit as part of a photography class he and 14 other Marines at the base's Wounded Warrior Battalion participated in for 12 weeks as part of the recovery process from battlefield wounds. The class, called fStop was organized by the Yountville-based Tug McGraw Foundation. Photo by Cpl. Shaltiel Dominguez (not related to the subject).

— A group of injured Camp Pendleton Marines participated in a photography class aimed at helping wounded service members express themselves through art as part of the recovery process from battlefield wounds.

Fifteen Marines at the Wounded Warrior Battalion graduated from the 12-week fStop photography course run by the Tug McGraw Foundation, a nonprofit based at the Veterans Home in Yountville that provides support for people with brain tumors and brain related trauma, including post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury.

The class led by professional photographer Terence Ford, taught wounded Marines how to communicate through photography.

Marines took photos of their families and went out in the community for photo shoots. Participants worked out of a photo lab at the Wounded Warrior Battalion.

The class was aimed at helping wounded service members transition into civilian life. Participants were challenged to be introspective, Ford said. The first assignment required participants to take pictures of themselves or things that represent who they are.

Photography works as a healing tool giving service members a way to engage the community and their families, said Jennifer Brusstar, co-founder and CEO of Tug McGraw Foundation.

Marines who completed the class were congratulated by Brig. Gen. Edward Banta, Commanding General, Marine Corps Installations-West and Maj. Gen. Lawrence Nicholson, commanding general, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, at a ceremony earlier this month at the Hope and Care Center on base.

The next class is scheduled for June 23.

For information, visit http://www.fstopwarrior.org or email terenceford55@gmail.com or call (707) 738-3134.

June 12, 2015

Results Are In! Photos, Scores & Read how Mother Nature made her Debut!

 

 

CLICK HERE, To View our Pro-Am Winners, Team Scores,  Highlights, Media Coverage, and Photos from our Double Header! Including our Songwriters Round where even Mother Nature made her debut prior to the show!

 

CLICK HERE, To Read How Mother Nature Stopped by Prior to the Show!

 

DOWNLOAD,  A Copy of the Two Day Program

 

 

Songwriters Round featured the talents of Mark Collie, Charles Esten, Lance Miller, Autumn McEntire, Mark Irwin, James Slater and Combat Marine Markus Fox and new comer Kerry Degman.

June 3, 2015

Session 7 TMF's fStop Students Graduate Today! Congrats

 

Congrats in store to all of you for efforts and incredible talent. Thank You, Terence for your great teaching efforts. Click here, to download a copy of their images and powerful artist statements, and  or visit our program site at www.fstopwarrior.org

 

Enrollment Open for Session 8

 

 

 

April 13, 2015

Sold Out!

 

Read Full Press Release

Event site: WWW.TUGMCGRAWPROAM.ORG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Tug McGraw Foundation to Host Highly Anticipated Fundraisers:June 8th, An Evening in the Songwriters Round Emceed by Storme Warren & June 9th, The Sold-Out 4th Annual Celebrity Sporting Clay Pro-Am


Proceeds from both events to benefit The Tug McGraw Foundation (TMF) and its work to improve quality of life for our nation’s battle-wounded, ill and injured service members and civilians living with brain-related trauma and tumors.

March 29, 2015

60 Minutes Follows Brain Cancer Patients at Duke University

Tug McGraw was treated at Duke by this incredible team.   We are proud to share this very special 60 Minute Story on Duke's efforts in battling one of the deadliest forms of cancers, Glioblastoma-the brain cancer that took Tug's life. Thanks to Duke at their researchers they are giving hope to others.

 

Killing Cancer 60 Minutest Follows Brain Cancer Patients in a Duke University

of a therapy that uses a re-engineered polio virus to kill cancer cells

 

The long war on cancer has left us well short of victory. Radiation flashed on in the 19th century, chemotherapy began to drip in the 20th but, for so many, 100 years of research adds up to just a few more months of life. Well tonight, you're about see a discovery for the 21st century that may be a big leap forward --awakening the power of the body's immune system.

 

For 10 months, we've been inside an experimental therapy at Duke University. Some of the patients there use words that doctors don't use, like "miracle" and "cure." And that's remarkable, because these patients were handed a death sentence, a relentless brain cancer called glioblastoma. To beat it, researchers are doing something that many thought was crazy, they are infecting the tumors with polio -- the virus that has crippled and killed for centuries.


In just a moment, polio will be dripped into the brain of 58-year-old Nancy Justice. Her glioblastoma tumor was discovered in 2012. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiation bought her two and a half years. But the tumor came roaring back. Now, the virus in this syringe, which mankind has fought to eradicate from the earth, is the last chance she has in the world.

 

 

For more information on the Duke University polio trial or other brain cancer trials, click here or call 919-684-5301

 

Watch Full Episode

 


 

Source: 60 minutes

March 26, 2015

Opening Day at TMF Headquarters-Veterans Making A Difference

It is a privilege for the Tug McGraw Foundation to be headquartered at the Veterans Home Of Yountville in California.

Everyday we pinch ourselves to be surrounded by veteran residents who all our unique with incredible talents and  tales to share.  We are grateful to the Yountville Veterans Home Leadership and Staff  who support our efforts in helping to champion the dreams the residents want to accomplish from gardening to now playing ball.

 

The Veterans Home of Yountville was built in the 1800's for our Civil and Spanish War Veterans.  The Tug McGraw Foundation was "spellbound" when shown archived photos from the original family who inspired one of America's most beautiful ballparks, Borman Field. This ballpark has had the distinct honor of welcoming so many heroes.

 

Join Us for Opening Day April 2015, at Borman Field at 4:00pm

Come watch, participate and play

We need runners Contact info@tugmcgraw.org


In honor of The Yountville Veterans Home Founder's Day on April 1st and for Opening Day with our Veteran Softball Team, The Mixed Nutts; we share with you two tribute videos. Borman Field from Yesteryear and an introduction to the Veterans Home Mixed Nutts. They range from 60 years old to 94 years young! Tug loved playing on this field as a kid but he would loved nothing more than playing with this team today. This is what it's all about folks..."Ya Gotta Believe."

 


 

 

 

VIEW 2015 SCHEDULE

March 25, 2015

Spring has Sprung at TMF! Plant, Play, Participate all for a Purpose

 

 

Mixed Nutts Meet and Greet-Friday, March 27th from 3pm-5pm

at Grant Hall-Veterans Home Yountville. Schedule at www.mixednutts.org

We are in need of runners for out team if you would like to volunteer please

contact us at info@tugmcgraw.org

 

 

Tickets on Sale Now!

 

 

Plotting and Planting for the 2015 Season with our Veterans in Yountville-interested in

volunteering Email us at info@tugmcgraw.org

 

 

Thinking about joining and have questions...ask our coaches Kevin Leathers and Jeff McMahon

Coachkevin@tugmcgraw.org or CoachJeff@tugmcgraw.org

 

March 17, 2015

Remembering the irrepressible Tug McGraw on St. Patrick's Day

Tug McGraw — who once showed up to a March 17 exhibition game with his Phillies uniform dyed green — is famously responsible for introducing St. Patrick’s Day to Phillies spring training, which later spread across Major League Baseball.

McGraw broke into the big leagues with the Mets on April 18, 1965, when he was just 20 years old. He had a respectable rookie campaign, tossing 97.2 innings with a 3.32 ERA (106 ERA+). He tossed his last game of his rookie campaign on Sept. 22, 1965, and the very next day he reported to Parris Island to fulfill his military service obligation. He would serve six years as a reserve rifleman, or as he proudly called himself “a trained killer.”

Tug McGraw (TSN Archives)

PHOTO GALLERY: Baseball celebrates St. Patrick's Day

 

On July 31, 1969, the 55-44 (.556) Mets sat in third place in the National League, 6.5 games back of the first place Cubs. The Mets — later be dubbed the Amazin’ Mets — went on a tear, finishing the season with a 45-18 (.714) record to claim first place. McGraw was an instrumental bullpen piece for the Mets, giving up just two earned runs in his final 19 games (38 innings – 0.47 ERA). The Mets would go on to win the 1969 World Series, but unfortunately for McGraw, he never appeared in a game. Despite this, McGraw looked back on 1969 fondly, saying, “Everything changed for me in 1969, the year we turned out to be goddamned amazing, all right.

 

McGraw fortified himself as a staple in the Mets bullpen from 1970-72, tossing 307.2 innings with a 2.16 ERA (165 ERA+). And then in 1973, McGraw coined his renowned battle cry, “Ya Gotta Believe!” as he helped lead a Mets team that was sub-.500 as late as September 20th to the National League Pennant. After a heartbreaking loss in the 1973 World Series to the Athletics, Tug struggled mightily in 1974, setting a National League ‘record’ by surrendering four grand-slams in a season.

 

McGraw began his ‘second career’ with the Phillies in 1975, putting his rough 1974 campaign behind him. He finished his first season in Philadelphia with a 2.50 ERA (126 ERA+). From 1976-78, McGraw coupled with Ron Reed mastered a bullpen that helped the Phillies to three straight first place finishes, though they never made it to the World Series. After three consecutive years of playoff disappointment, the Phillies struggled in 1979 — finishing just fourth in the National League — and so did McGraw, posting a 5.16 ERA (74 ERA+).

 

In 1980, the team founded as the Quakers in 1883 won its first ever World Series. They were led in large part by their closer, McGraw. McGraw finished fifth in Cy Young Award voting with 20 saves and a 1.46 ERA in 92.1 innings that season. He fittingly made the final out of the clinching game of the Phillies' first World Championship, striking out Willie Wilson with the bases loaded — claiming his status as the storied franchise’s greatest folk hero as he iconically jumped with both arms in the air celebrating the long awaited victory.

 

McGraw’s heroic efforts were awarded with four year, $1.5 million deal, which he signed in December 1980. When Tug was asked how he would spend his newfound wealth, he responded, "Ninety percent I'll spend on good times, women, and Irish Whiskey. The other 10 percent I'll probably waste." Tug pitched well over the course of his contract, but never quite returned his 1980 glory. He would retire on Valentine’s Day in 1985, which he felt was appropriate, stating, “I’ve had a love affair with baseball…the game stole my heart and I was never a jilted suitor.”

 

McGraw was a rare breed, loved by Phillies and Mets fans alike. He was inducted into the Mets Hall of Fame in 1993 and was granted membership on the Phillies Wall of Fame in 1999. McGraw was serving as a special instructor for the Phillies in Spring of 2003, but on March 12, 2003, just five days before Tug’s favorite day, he fell ill. He was hospitalized with a brain tumor that would prove to be cancerous and malignant. Tug was given three weeks to live.

 

McGraw took to his cancer treatment with the same intensity he had on the mound, with the same confidence he has a Marine. More incredible than the Amazin’ Mets of 1969, baring down with greater intensity than when he faced Willie Wilson with two outs and the bases loaded in the bottom of the ninth, the stubborn Irishman turned three weeks into ten brilliant months of life – time he used not to sulk in his own misfortune, rather to spread his eternal message of optimism, “Ya Gotta Believe.”

 

Tug McGraw died on Jan. 4, 2004, but his never-say-die attitude lives on in the hearts of Phillies and Mets fans — one of their very few common bonds. On this St. Patrick’s Day I choose to honor Tug the way he spent his favorite holiday — with baseball in green jerseys, beer and Irish Whiskey, and a personal day off tomorrow.

Source:

Sporting News contributor Ryan Spaeder is the creator and owner/operator of the popular Twitter account Ace of MLB Stats (@aceballstats ).

 

February 21, 2015

Country Artist, TY Herndon and TMF to Grant 99 Year Old Veteran His Wish

The Tug McGraw Foundation (TMF) together with Country artist, Ty Herndon is granting ninety-nine year old, Veteran, Jim Scheer from the California Veterans Home of Yountville, a life long wish of recording his “Gingerbread Man “song. A song he penned in the early 40’s. Country Singer, Ty Herndon and Jim’s music therapist, Leanne Wade from the California Veterans Home of Yountville music program will coach Jim in helping lay down the tracks, sing, and record his song.

 

 

 

American best-selling author and screenwriter Irving Wallace was Jim's classmate and encouraged him to write for a career. Jim was well on his way as a Hollywood reporter before he had to report to duty for Uncle Sam. He Interviewed legends from John Barrymore to Susan Hayward. Jim’s books inspired and served as the basis for David Wolper’s Academy-Award nominated documentary, "The Race for Space." In Photo: Jim and his music therapist Leanne Wade

 

Background

 

TMF was first introduced to the home’s music program when CEO, Jennifer Brusstar attended their annual talent show. “I was blown away after seeing the quality and effort these incredible veterans did in their two hour program. Sixty to ninety-eight year old residents were performing songs and playing instruments from the Doors to Patty Page. What excited us is knowing the impact a music program can have in helping improve connections in the brain. Research shows learning to play an instrument or dancing everyday can reduce your risk of dementia by nearly 60 percent!” Naturally, when the foundation learned about Jim and his life long wish, Jennifer picked up the phone and called Tim McGraw’s sister, Sandy Howard. “Ok lady we need to make this happen!” Within minutes, Sandy called back and said Ty Herndon would be honored to grant Jim’s wish!

 

Jim Sheer is no stranger when it comes to writing. He has authored and co-authored dozens of books and written more than a 1000 articles in nutrition and health. His book, “Foods That Heal” sold nearly a million copies. One of Jim’s books inspired and served as the basis for David Wolper’s Academy-Award nominated documentary, “The Race for Space.” “I’m excited for this opportunity for Jim, we discovered his desire to sing his song while in a reminiscing session. We are simply grateful to Ty and to The Tug McGraw Foundation for making the time in helping Jim accomplish his dream in music.” Leanne Wade

 

ABOUT THE ORGANIZATIONS AND ARTIST


Benefits of Music Therapy: Music Therapy is the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program.

 

Music Therapy is an established health profession in which music is used within a therapeutic relationship to address physical, emotional, cognitive, and social needs of individuals. After assessing the strengths and needs of each client, the qualified music therapist provides the indicated treatment including creating, singing, moving to, and/or listening to music. Through musical involvement in the therapeutic context, clients' abilities are strengthened and transferred to other areas of their lives. Music therapy also provides avenues for communication that can be helpful to those who find it difficult to express themselves in words. Research in music therapy

supports its effectiveness in many areas such as: overall physical rehabilitation and facilitating movement, increasing people's motivation to become engaged in their treatment, providing emotional support for clients and their families, and providing an outlet for expression of feelings.  Source: American Music Therapy

 

About Ty Herndon

Ty Herndon was born in the heart of Mississippi, and was raised in Alabama. He grew up enamored with much of the Gospel music that was around the south, performing around home as a teenager. After high school, he moved to the Lone Star State, where he developed his craft so well he was named as Texas Entertainer of the Year in 1993. Not too long after that, Ty found himself on the roster of Epic Records. His first single, “What Mattered Most,” topped the charts in the summer of 1999, and led to other number ones as “Living In A Moment” and “It Must Be Love.” He notched a pair of Gold albums for his first two releases – What Mattered Most and Living In A Moment. The past few years have seen no end to Ty’s artistry – as he earned a Dove Award and also a Grammy nomination for his 2010 release “Journey On,” and received some of the most sterling reviews of his career for his thought-provoking “Lies I Told Myself,” from his album of the same name. www.tyherndon.info/

 

About The Veterans Home of Yountville California

​​Located in the heart of scenic Napa Valley, the Veterans Home of California-Yountville (VHC-Yountville) is a community of and for veterans. Founded in 1884, VHC-Yountville is the largest veterans’ home in the United States, offering residential accommodations with a wealth of recreational, social, and therapeutic activities for independent living. Some 1,000 aged or disabled veterans (both men and women) or World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Desert Storm, and Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom now live at the home. www.calvet.ca.gov/VetHomes/Pages/Yountville.aspx

 

About The Tug McGraw Foundation (TMF)

TMF was established by Tug McGraw in 2003 to raise funds to enhance the quality of life of children and adults with brain tumors and their families by stimulating and facilitating research that addresses the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and spiritual impact of the disease. Recognizing that other areas of brain research - such as traumatic brain injury and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder - inform the science surrounding brain cancer, TMF has widened its scope to include a broader spectrum of the neuroscience to support advances in medical care and quality of life for our nation’s battle-wounded, ill and injured service members. www.tugmcgraw.org


 

 

February 3, 2015

TMF Visits Innovative Brain Treatment Center Offering Evidence Based Hope

INNOVATIVE BRAIN TREATMENT OFFERS NEW HOPE TO SERVICE MEMBERS & VETERANS IMPACTED BY POST TRAUMATIC STRESS AND TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY Newport Beach, CA (January 12, 2015) – According to a Washington Post article released today, service-members and Veterans now have an opportunity to undergo a revolutionary new treatment using an individualized protocol developed by the Brain Treatment Center in Newport Beach, CA. Currently funded through grants by Infinite Hero, Airpower Foundation, Task Force Dagger Foundation and independent donors, treatment has been provided to over 100 Veterans and active duty service members who were suffering the effects of combat-related mental injuries with measurable improvements in all subjects.

 

In addition, a double-blind study is currently underway to measure the efficacy of the treatment. Magnetic Resonance Therapy (MRT℠ ) is an emerging, novel form of patient-specific, non-invasive neuro-modulation for neurological disorders for which conventional medical, surgical, and therapy treatments have offered little hope. MRT℠ treatment was developed by Yi Jin, MD founder of the “Newport Brain Research Lab” (NBRL), a consortium of scientists, researchers and international outpatient clinics, under the name “Brain Treatment Center (BTC)”. In MRT℠ treatment, BTC has augmented the well-established and safe technique of trans-cranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) through a proprietary algorithm developed by university professors based in Newport Beach, California. NBRL operates a number of clinics world-wide to deliver a patient-specific treatment based on the results of a quantitative electroencephalogram (QEEG). Originally developed to treat autism, MRT has found unparalleled success in treatment of PTS. After an initial evaluation subjects will undergo daily 30-minute treatments for up to 2 months. Based on initial findings, symptom relief is often achieved in a matter of days. Senior neuroscientists are recognizing these results, “Patients that will respond to treatment are identified after only a few days. In this way MRT has the real potential to be a game changer in the treatment of neurological disorders,” says Dr. Charles Liu, Professor of Neurological Surgery, Neurology, and Biomedical Engineering and Director of the University of Southern California Center for Neurorestoration, Los Angeles, California. “What the Brain Treatment Center has done is revolutionary. Using evidence-based principles with MRT, they have created a delivery system that customizes treatment based on the patient’s own QEEG”, says Dr. Kevin T. Murphy, Associate Professor and Vice Chair of the Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, UC San Diego Medical Center. “Addressing the core frequency mismatch that occurs in various parts of the brain, and not the patient’s symptoms per se, allows this system to be potentially useful in numerous psychological and neurological disorders, from autism to Alzheimers.”

 

For further inquiries contact: media@braintreatmentcenter.com Lorraine Silvetz MSW: (949) 656-9979

 

Website: www.braintreatmentcenter.com


TMF VISIT

"As a mom who has a son with autism and as a leader whose obligation is to find and share worthy treatment options fo
r brain tumor and brain disorders, I was not prepared to walk into BTC's waiting room to  see children with autism, veterans and stroke patients sitting side by side. I'm encouraged to see what is being done here. Yes,  a new found hope for this community and how this technology can help with chemo brain. Dr. Jin and his team are certainly one to watch as they continue to  push out evidence-based research for brain-related disorders and diseases." CEO, Jennifer Brusstar

 


IN PHOTO:

 

CEO, Marjorie Morrison of PsychArmor, Jessica Vizcaino, CEO, Jennifer Brusstar of the Tug McGraw Foundation  Veteran, Joseph Hummel shared his experience with his PTS and his son's autism, and founder Dr. Jin.

 

Jessica Vizacanio getting a demonstration of the EEG.